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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
was meandering toward ending the war in afghanistan and allowing the pentagon and you have to remember when you're looking at the pentagon, you're looking at an institution that has the fine motor skills of a dinosaur. it takes the pentagon a long time to put something together, such as a timetable for withdrawal. all obama has to do, and i know it is not that simple, but i would look at the gorbachev experience. he came in 1985, he gave a speech in 1986 denouncing afghanistan as a bleeding wound. he had secretly told schultz at the military was going to get one year to turn it around. and that they wouldn't be able to. he announced a timetable, and then he was gone and 89. we need to do something similar, the military had its chances, we had 11 commanders in afghanistan in 11 years, take a look at this book by the general, which devotes a lot of attention to this. that is not a war where we can be successful. that is not in the military we have. there is no military that has ever been successful with counterinsurgency. not only that, but they have an ally in pakistan where we survived with bil
into words and the the war afghanistan and he's allowing the pentagon and you have to remember when you're looking at the pentagon you are looking at an institution that has defined motor skills and a dinosaur. if you take the pentagon a long time to put something together all but obama has to do and i know it isn't this simple but i would look at the gorbachev experience. he came out of 1985 he gave the secret speech in 1986 denouncing afghanistan to his fellow bureau colleagues as a bleeding wound he had the moxie secretly tell shultz we were getting out that the military was going to get one year to turnaround and the wouldn't feel to. they announced a timetable and they were gone. we need to do something similar. they had their chances we had 11 commanders and afghanistan in 11 years take a look at thomas rex book the generals that devotes a lot of attention to this isn't a war we can be successful and the kind of military we have. there is no military that had ever been successful in the counterinsurgency where they have a sanctuary. not only did it have a sanctuary but in outlinin
. we will be live from pentagon in a minute. >>> and falling from space, wow, pretty cool, at a rate of more than 843 miles per hour, that's how fast dare devil felix baumgartner fell when he jumped from space. the official speed has been released. even faster now than those record keepers thought at first. pretty cool stuff. >>> one of our top stories today at cnn, a secret american drone base somewhere in saudi arabia, now this is according, these are reports from two major newspapers today, saying that this u.s. launches these drone attacks against al qaeda targets from that particular base. i want to bring in two folks here at the pentagon chris lawrence also michael holmes from cnn international. chris, it's not a total surprise that this was there in saudi arabia, but certainly it was not something that they officially wanted to reveal. why are they doing it now? >> that's the big question, suzanne, why did this come out? we reported two years ago from our sources u.s. officials were telling us the cia was building an airstrip in the a arabian peninsula. it was hinted it would
and women in uniform today as the pentagon threats pay cuts and deployments on hold, automatic cuts to the defense budget. and for america, he joins us now on the question of whether our troops are going to pay a price for washington's failure to make tough decisions. hi, pete. >> how are you doing, alisyn. >> alisyn: as you know, leon panetta is suggesting just 1% pay raise for our men and women in uniform that won't keep up with the cost of living there, what they'll have to pay going ahead next year. what do you think that would do for military families? >> well, it is a defacto pay cut and i think the military families are looking at the other side and also recently announced the civilian work force, they're unfreezing pay freezes that have happened for nonmerit paid government positions outside of the military so they're seeing salaries go up outside of the military and their salaries going down and you know what they say and i see, we see one gigantic political cop-out. that's what the sequestration debate has turned into. the president refuses to lead, no one will talk detail
that the pentagon has said are going to be out there. so the question is, on top of all those things that you just talked about is what is the impact on the middle class? so the question the president is asking is why don't we take a step back, let's fix this in a kind of balanced way the president has proposed and the senate democrats have proposed with a reasonable amount of spending cuts and a reasonable amount of revenue raisers so that we can get this thing done and move on to the business of the country. >> but help me understand because we have a budget. this is -- look at exactly what this is. $85 billion this year out of a budget of 3.8 trillion. you can see just the small slice and then if you look at the sequester over ten years, we're talking about 1.2 trillion out of $47 trillion in projected government spending. is it really impossible to find less than 3% of savings in a federal budget without making those kind of horrible cuts? >> you know what, it's not impossible, and that's exactly what the president has done over the last year, $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction. he's ready to
are to buy the pentagon didn't show you any video of things that miss. that is bad pr. and the percentage of weapons that were smart weapons in the first gulf war but infinitely more than anything the iraqis had was remarkably small compared to the impression the pentagon gave them a military briefing for the alicia pictures of smart bombs and smart missiles and things fly into windows. that was the percentage actually expended. so i don't think this is a revolution in military affairs so much as a vivid demonstration of just how proficient the united states was in waging war, especially can do this proficient adversary. but it also is a military affairs in a fundamentalist about is the car still has a boat here and the ultimate goal of the conflict was a political goal and therefore the military plan made that involve smart and weapons were designed with a traditional military conclusion, which in truth is not revolutionary at all, getting the enemy to do what she wanted. i can't see it as fares. and getting assigned from the back right of time, but i do want to give -- >> yet, let randy
from georgetown, serve as my chief of staff at the c.i.a. and then followed me to the pentagon as my chief of staff. and also someone who's had a public affairs at the pentagon, george little, who is also someone who both graduated and later taught here at georgetown. talented young individuals who have been at my side every day for the last four years at both the c.i.a. and the pentagon, and i am deeply grateful for their work for me and on behalf of the nation and i am deeply grateful for georgetown for training such extraordinary public servants. and speaking of extraordinary public servants, i think many in this audience know that there's a georgetown professor that the president has nominated to serve as the next secretary of defense, chuck hagel, and i am confident and i've expressed that confidence publicly that the men and women of the department of defense will have the kind of advocate they need as the nation emerges from more than a decade of war. lastly, i'm honored to be here, as i said, as a catholic and as a proud graduate of another jesuit institution, santa clara uni
get it worse? i worked in the pentagon. it would have made it a lot better. so we realized you really have to go after the people who do the work, people who do logistics, communications, pass information, do car bombs, you have to take those out. we came up with a strategy, philadelphia would love this. it is like rocky balboa and apollo creed. we'll hit them in the midsection and hit them a lot. from august of 2004 when we did 18 raids, two years, later, same month, same force, same fight, we were doing 300 raids a month. that was ten a night. now, if you stop and you say, well, ten a night, that's a lot, that's impressive. that means every raid guy on the force is going on a raid at least one raid every night. every pilot's flying one or 2:00 raids every night. and these raids are not patrols. this is not with foot, these are going in the door, somebody is getting shot. extraordinary, and to do that though you can't use previous systems. one you've got to be able to bring in this intelligence on an industrial scale. you have got to be able -- we got to the point where instead of th
military community where he plans to highlight painful cuts they say for the pentagon and the u.s. navy. but republican leaders calling on the president to quote, stop campaigning and help them solve the problem. but at the moment, there are no meetings planned between any of these sides, the house, the senate, the white house and they're taking friday off as of now. martha: all right. well the looming budget cuts were high on the agenda when the president sat down with the national governors association yesterday. arizona governor jan brewer went "on the record" with greta van susteren to get her impressions exactly what happened at that meeting. here's that. >> you know, he definitely says he wants to work together but obviously he doesn't want to compromise one little bit. bottom line he wants to raise taxes. and he doesn't want to cut. i think the american people believed, that the time now is to start cutting the budget. martha: so when it came to compromising governor brewer went on to say that the president said that the elections were basically behind him and that he was going t
doing this from tsa to the pentagon and you have the white house, i believe, egging them on. it's in the white house' interest to create the most lurid possible story about what the cuts would mean. they want to put them off or substitute tax increases for them. jon: we heard ray lahood talking about airport patrol towers that will be unmanned from midnight on. frankly there are a lot of airport control towers unmanned from midnight on and pilots land anyway. >> the way these things were designed, they were designed to be stupid and designed to make it painful for both sides. so they do something else to reduce the deficit instead, that is not going to happen. the sequester is going to happen march 1st and i think after that at some point hopefully both sides will sit down and figure out a more rational way to allocate these cuts. these cuts should happen. if we can't gut 3% of the budget over ten years we moisture as well declare national bankruptcy right now. jon: interesting that its discretionary funding, and programs that are getting cuts, no cuts from mandatory spending. >
gives us an accounting. what did the president do? >> the pentagon has announced an expansion of benefits offered to gay and lesbian couples. members of the military in same- sex relationships will receive full access to base facilities and groups, as well as joint assignments. but a number of benefits will still be denied, including health-insurance coverage and on base housing. those restrictions are expected to remain in place until the 1996 defense of marriage act is fully repealed. a federal judge has overturned a state law in arizona barring funding for the reproductive services group planned parenthood. the law banned the use of public funds by state or local government to contract with the organization that provides abortions as one of its services. in his ruling, u.s. district judge neil wake found the law unlawfully denies medicaid recipients the right to choose a medical services. in a statement, planned parenthood of arizona said -- and those are some of the headlines. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. looking at
georgetown, served as my chief of staff at the cia and followed me to the pentagon as my chief of staff. and also someone who is head of public affairs at the pentagon, george little, who is also someone who both graduated and later taught here at georgetown. talented, young individuals who have been at my side every day for the last four years at both the cia and the pentagon. and i'm deeply grateful for fore work on behalf of me and on behalf of the nation. and i'm deeply grateful to georgetown for training such extraordinary public servants. and speaking of extraordinary public servants, i think many in this audience know that there's a georgetown professor that the president has nominated to serve as the next secretary of defense, chuck hagel. i am confident and i've expressed that confidence publicly that the men and women of the department of defense will have the kind of advocate that they need as the nation emerges for more than a decade of war. lastly, i'm honored to be here, as i said, as a catholic and as a proud graduate of another just what institution, santa clara universi
hagel will show up for his first day of work in the pentagon. he was confirmed last night by a 58-41 vote. and the president's choice for treasury secretary could be confirmed today, jack lew. he sailed through the senate finance committee yesterday. >>> stunning decision from natureo. a really bad clerical error. a 7% decline in violence in afghanistan last year, turns out was inaccurate. taliban attacks held steady. and militants killed 17 people overnight, including ten afghan police officers while they slept this in the gazni province in afghanistan. >>> dennis rodman is in north korea, of all places. with three members of the famed harlem globetrotters to put on a show for fans while she film a tv documentary. rodman, known as the worm, tweeting from inside north korea and saying maybe i'll run into the gangnam style dude while i'm here. psy, he is south korean, not north korean. >> a little bit of a problem. >> a big difference. >> i haven't heard the nickname the worm since about 1999. >> rodman, bad as i want to be. >> yet there he is tweeting from north korea. >>> still a
at the pentagon in alexandria, virginia. hagel expected to make remarks later this hour. >>> police released photos wanted for questioning, they say 22-year-old tanesha howard was inside a black suv when shots were fired. her mother says the suspected shooter is the young woman's boyfriend. >>> the star of an iconic anti-smoking ad has died. >> they say nicotine isn't addictive. how can they say that? >> debi austin became famous to are this commercial warning others about the dangers of cigarette smoking. she died friday after a long bat well cancer. >>> the college admissions test known as the s.a.t. is getting a makeover. the college board says the new test will focus more on knowledge and skills high schoolers need to succeed in college. no word on when students will begin taking the new test. >>> talk back today, is it right for dennis rodman to be in north korea? facebook.com/carolcnn or tweet me @carolcnn. i've always had to keep my eye on her... but, i didn't always watch out for myself. with so much noise about health care... i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get informat
the pentagon press corps for an award called the distinguished medal. he also addressed north korea's's nuclear program and the troops withdraw and afghanistan and sequestration. >> as you know, this is i believe my final press conference here at the pentagon briefing room. there are moments when i thought it was the last act of an italian opera. i'm not sure exactly when it would end and the fat lady would sing. but i think that the congress will act and they will confirm chuck hagel this week. so what i wanted to do is to use this opportunity to first of all thank you all, all of you that are part of the press corps here and the press in general. throughout my 50 years in public service, i have always believed very deeply in the role of the press. because i believe deeply in the role of the american people in our democracy, the information is the key to an informed electorate. while we may or may not agree with every story in the grand scheme of things, because of the work of the press i believe the truth always comes out. and in the end, we cannot really serve the american people well unless
at the pentagon. and by eric holder today. but eric holder seemed to be either conflating or combining imminent threat with ongoing threat. tell me about the memo itself. >> that is exactly the rub. they have -- it is certainly true that administration officials, all those you mentioned, have articulated that it is the bottom administration policy that targeted killings of americans who are associated with al qaeda are lawful and constitutional under certain conditions, and the first concern is that the individual poses an imminent threat of a violent attack against the united states. in other words, capture is not feasible, and the operation is done according to law or principles. what this memo does, which is not something that has been public, is flesh that out and provide details about what they mean by that, and one of those striking points is when they get to defining imminent threat. they talk about a broader -- the memo explicitly says that they have intelligence that the targeted individual is involved in an active plot against the united states. what they mean is that this individual
during a pentagon investigation into e-mails that he had exchanged with a civilian woman who was linked to the scandal that forced the director david petraeus to resign. he has since been cleared of wrongdoing. "the washington post" reporting the general is leading service because his wife is seriously ill. a discussion on the sequester hosted by politico this morning was disrupted by protesters. they spoke out against the across-the-board cuts that go into effect on march 1st entered into an explanation by former white house chief of staff erskin bowles ms. luft -- of other cuts could be made. here is a look. >> talking backstage over talking abut the sequester that most people in the room believe will happen on march 1st as automatic cuts. mr. bowles when you have referred to them as dumb, stupid. you used that word three times to estimate a are dumb and they are stupid, stupid, stupid. look, there is no business in the country that makes the cuts across the board. you go in there and you try to search for the things that have the least at first effect on productivity. second, cutting
of improving efficiency within the pentagon. i would say that applies to all the other agencies as well. secondly, most of the concern about sequestration is focused on readiness and training, which is absolutely true. if you talk to the lawyers that work with the defense contractors, they think they will have a field day care and some had testimony last year that the legal hassles emanating from sequestration may eat up a lot of their savings. but beyond that, there are a lot of dangerous places in the world. and what we do is try to develop capability to deal with the unknowable contingencies of what could happen at a place like syria or iran or north korea. with less money, you can prepare for future contingencies. the point is that it does not just readiness. it hurts us in the real world today. there are lots of options to deal with this. as was mentioned, the house passed bills twice last year to substitute sequestration's savings for other more targeted savings so that you save this amount of money, you're still fiscally responsible, but you don't get defense and these domestic p
there and can be a very effective leader at the pentagon. john brennan is somebody i worked with as director of the c.i.a. and continue to work with in this capacity. and i always found him to be very responsible about how we can effectively conduct operations against al qaeda and against those that would attack this country. he is somebody a straight shooter, somebody who gives you his best opinion. he doesn't play games. he's someone who i think can really honestly represent the best protection of this country in that job. >> thank you very much. and i want to thank you for your forth right comments today about the sequester. ironically as what you said in your statement, it appears the greatest threat to the united states security is the united states congress. thank you, mr. secretary. >> thank you. let me mention this, after senator nelson, the first round will be over. there may be a number of us who may want a few minutes on the second round and you two witnesses have been here for three hours and you may need a five or 10-minute break. do you want that following senator nelson or go
accept the criticism that the pentagon should have been warning about these sooner? >> first, we started the slowdown in spending on january 10. a number of the measures that i mentioned went into effect shortly after that. significant efforts were made to slow down spending on more draconian actions later. i know that people felt we should have said more earlier. 15 months ago the secretary sent a letter to the u.s. congress saying that the effects of sequestration would be devastating. after that we testified in august and again in september, we listed every single major item we're talking about. we said that there would be cutbacks in readiness and a unit buys would go down with unit costs growing up. what we did not do was detailed budget planning. i do not regret that. if we did it 60 months ago, we would have been wrong. we would not know that congress would have changed the size and the date and we would not have incurred the tigre -- we would not have incurred the degradation route. we sounded the alarm in every way that we could. >> what kind of contract are you having with the
, there is concern of layoffs. the dimensions darpa -- you d darpa. the except the restraints on the pentagon plus those coming into play, that have negative impacts? >> we are not a big player in that space anymore. i think a little bit of catalyst is something you see in every corner of the world. whether it is europe or china or anyplace else, i did not go to one place where there is no one government at all. the private sector is still very strong here and innovative. the private sector can pick up a lot. just getting it done. the will be such a value in a just getting some of these things behind us so we can adjust to move forward. the sigh of relief is incredibly important right now. i am an optimist. it does not end with a discussion on washington. we can compete. the work force of the to this country is as good as any in the world. >> thank you for the optimistic note. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] moste church is boston's visited historic site. half a million come to the church every year because
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)

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